Hotel California

 

“Social media is like the Hotel California. You can log out anytime you like, but you can never leave…”

Beaton wrote this and I commented something like, “Haha! That’s hilarious!” ThoughtBubble

But, see, it’s not. I mean, it is Hotel California but it’s not really funny. If you follow.

We log out but it’s on the brain. There’s an almost imperceptible tug. (Although, for some people, it’s more like being a roped cattle.)

I have to get some shout-outs ready for (fill-in-the-blank) hashtag day.

I need to acknowledge those mentions or RT something of theirs.

I never tweeted my blog post from this week.

I’ve got to catch up on reading blogs and tweeting them.

I love this book—I wonder if the author’s on Twitter.

Ooh! Some new Harry Potter covers! I have to tweet about that!

Most of us on social media have thought one of these things at some point. Or, if not, you’ll leave a comment here saying, “Pfft! That doesn’t happen to me!” (I’d appreciate a little “how I do it” in there, if you wouldn’t mind.)

My pull from social media is fairly mild. But it’s there and I worry about that. I don’t want to get caught (any more than I already am) in the tangled web of Twitter.

 

Hotel California has been accused of being about a lot of different topics. That’s the beauty of this song—it’s about what it’s about but it can be applied to many situations where someone is stuck by his or her own device.

We are all just prisoners here, of our own device.”

Can you log out any time you like? Can you really leave?

 

Sarah B Hotel California

My Sunday thoughts in 200 words or less.

 

Twitter Trends: Trash or Treasure?

 

You’re on Twitter? So you know that sidebar with all the trends. It’s loaded with absurdity like #RuinAMovieWithBacon, #DescribeYourPoopIn4Words, and #LiesWeTellOurPetGiraffes.

Then there are the ones with celebrity break-ups, fall-outs, nose jobs, nose rings, weight gain, weight loss, and what color their hair was yesterday. It’s fascinating. Really.

There’s also breaking “news” trends (a.k.a. target practice). They scream, “Feeling aggressive? Ready for a virtual fight? Let your anger out right here!” And people do.

Sometimes there are awesome trends, like #Hemingway, #Shakespeare, or #EmilyDickinson with fabulous quotes for nerds like me. Also, I have learned about some incredibly cool “holidays” like National Coffee Day and National Chocolate Day.

It’s a mix. A dizzying display of words, names, places, and opinions.

I tend to ignore them but with their bright bold font, it’s difficult not to at least notice them. Which is, of course, the point. And occasionally (before someone rats me out) I’ve been known to #RuinADateIn3Words or something equally silly.

When I looked up the definition of “trending”, it actually had Twitter in the definition. I am quite serious. To be fair, that was online so I’ll smooth my ruffled feathers or dunk in the birdbath or whatever.

 

trend

verb

gerund or present participle: trending

  1. change or develop in a general direction.

          “unemployment has been trending upward”

          “interest rates are trending up

          “the Richelieu River trends northward to Lake Champlain”

  1. (of a topic) be the subject of many posts on a social media website within a short period of time.

          “I’ve just taken a quick look at what’s trending on Twitter right now”

 

Do you notice trends? Steal a glance to see if there’s something you’re interested in? Pointedly ignore them? Or actively seek them out to tweet about?

 

Trends

 

My Sunday thoughts in 200 words or less.

 

Oversharing on Social Media

 

When you haven’t blogged or been on Twitter, what do you do? I think some would answer with a resounding, “Nothing. Move on.” Others would say that a full-on explanation is warranted. I’m guessing that most people fall somewhere in the middle.

Personally, I feel I should write something.

When sharing information about my personal life in a very public way, where is the line? Do I keep it vague or go into details? How much is too much? And, more importantly, why am I thinking about this at all? Why, in the midst of a family crisis or health emergency or computer meltdown, am I worrying about what my online presence looks like to others?

I suppose you should let people know why you haven’t been online or won’t be online much. I suppose that’s the nice/right/proper thing to do. But… Is this common courtesy or TMI (too much information)?

 

So, when I should have been getting a huge reality slap about what’s important in life, I was thinking about all the blogs I haven’t commented on, the posts I hadn’t written, the updates I hadn’t made on my website, the tweets sitting in my drafts, the emails piling up in my inbox.

For anyone who is wondering, I’m about to overshare:

I went to the ER last week expecting a little help but was admitted to the hospital. I stayed a night. Then another. Then another… The world outside those four white walls faded away. I didn’t think about much besides my family. (And all the beeping machines, wires, IVs, tests, and blood pressure cuffs.) After a day or two, it hit me. The social media thing I’ve been yammering about. And here I am posting about my hospital stay and my ongoing treatment (a.k.a. wireless heart monitor I must wear 24 hrs. a day for a month). So I will post when I’m not passing out and will tweet when I’m not too dizzy. And there you go. Hope that is not too much information for you.

Cheers, gentle readers.

Oh, also, I have a strange habit of taking pictures at unseemly moments. I like to document everything—even the horrible things. So, for your viewing pleasure, this is my EEG. It’s one of the nicer photos. I look at bit like a modern techie Medusa but I’ve titled it “space mermaid”.

 

Sarah B Hospital - EEG

 

To Thank or Not to Thank – That Is the Question

 

I am polite. Too polite. Is there such a thing? I’m not sure but I do have a friend who jokes that I would write a thank you note to someone who wrote me a thank you note. I don’t know where she got that idea. (I’ve done it.)

I always say ‘please’ and ‘thank you’. I’ve taught my children to do so as well. ThoughtBubble

Moving on to social media. When I tweet someone’s post, it’s nice to receive a “thanks”. But it’s okay if I don’t. Some people retweet the shout-out. Or reply. Or favorite. Or tweet something of mine.

There’s no “right” way to handle this. I’ve read contradictory advice on what to do (I’m sure you’re shocked). Some recommend thanking. Others, reciprocation. Others suggest it’s not necessary to do anything.

I will say that if I scroll through someone’s timeline and see nothing, nothing, but “thanks, @schmoopypoo!” “thanks, @pumpkinhead!” “thanks, @ilovechocolate!” and on and on and on, I have no idea who this person is or what he or she is interested in.

I think you should thank but, on Twitter, there are several ways of doing this. How do you decide when and how to thank?

 

Thanks

 

My Sunday thoughts in 200 words or less.